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Phenotype of antigen unexperienced T(H) cells in the inflamed central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis

Authors

  • S. Franck
  • M. Paterka
  • J. Birkenstock
  • F. Zipp
  • V. Siffrin
  • E. Witsch

Journal

  • Journal of Neuroimmune Pharmacology

Citation

  • J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 12 (2): 305-313

Abstract

  • Multiple sclerosis is a chronic, disseminated inflammation of the central nervous system which is thought to be driven by autoimmune T cells. Genetic association studies in multiple sclerosis and a large number of studies in the animal model of the disease support a role for effector/memory T helper cells. However, the mechanisms underlying relapses, remission and chronic progression in multiple sclerosis or the animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, are not clear. In particular, there is only scarce information on the role of central nervous system-invading naive T helper cells in these processes. By applying two-photon laser scanning microscopy we could show in vivo that antigen unexperienced T helper cells migrated into the deep parenchyma of the inflamed central nervous system in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, independent of their antigen specificity. Using flow cytometric analyses of central nervous system-derived lymphocytes we found that only antigen-specific, formerly naive T helper cells became activated during inflammation of the central nervous system encountering their corresponding antigen.


DOI

doi:10.1007/s11481-016-9718-1