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Sarcomere gene mutations in isolated left ventricular noncompaction cardiomyopathy do not predict clinical phenotype

Authors

  • S. Probst
  • E. Oechslin
  • P. Schuler
  • M. Greutmann
  • P. Boye
  • W. Knirsch
  • F. Berger
  • L. Thierfelder
  • R. Jenni
  • S. Klaassen

Journal

  • Circulation Cardiovascular Genetics

Citation

  • Circ Cardiovasc Genet 4 (4): 367-374

Abstract

  • BACKGROUND: Left ventricular noncompaction of the myocardium (LVNC) has been recognized as a cardiomyopathy with a genetic etiology. Mutations in genes encoding sarcomere proteins were shown to be associated with LVNC. We have evaluated the potential clinical impact of genetic analysis of sarcomere genes in patients with LVNC. METHODS AND RESULTS: In this report, we identified 5 mutations in cardiac myosin-binding protein C (MYBPC3) and 2 mutations in alpha-tropomyosin (TPM1) in a cohort of unrelated adult probands with isolated LVNC. The mutations in MYBPC3 and TPM1 and in 6 other previously reported sarcomere genes in this cohort resulted in a total of 18 heterozygous mutations in 63 probands (29%). beta-myosin heavy chain (MYH7) was the most prevalent disease gene and accounts for 13% of cases followed by MYBPC3 (8%). Comparing sarcomere mutation-positive and mutation-negative LVNC probands showed no significant differences in terms of average age, myocardial function, presence of heart failure or tachyarrhythmias at initial presentation or at follow-up. Familial disease was found in 16 probands of which 8 were sarcomere mutation-positive. Non-penetrance was detected in 2 of 8 mutation-positive families with LVNC. CONCLUSIONS: Mutations in sarcomere genes account for a significant proportion of cases of isolated LVNC in this cohort (29%). The distribution of disease genes confirms genetic heterogeneity and opens new perspectives in genetic testing in patients with LVNC and their relatives at high risk of inheriting the cardiomyopathy. The presence or absence of a sarcomere gene mutation in LVNC cannot be related to the clinical phenotype.


DOI

doi:10.1161/CIRCGENETICS.110.959270