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Vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension and target-organ damage

Authors

  • L.B. Andersen
  • L. Przybyl
  • N. Haase
  • F. von Versen-Höynck
  • F. Qadri
  • J.S. Jørgensen
  • G.L. Sorensen
  • P. Fruekilde
  • M. Poglitsch
  • I. Szijarto
  • M. Gollasch
  • J. Peters
  • D.N. Muller
  • H.T. Christesen
  • R. Dechend

Journal

  • Journal of the American Heart Association

Citation

  • J Am Heart Assoc 4 (2): e001417

Abstract

  • BACKGROUND: We tested the controversial hypothesis that vitamin D depletion aggravates hypertension and target-organ damage by influencing renin. METHODS AND RESULTS: Four-week-old double-transgenic rats (dTGR) with excess angiotensin (Ang) II production due to overexpression of the human renin (hREN) and angiotensinogen (hAGT) genes received vitamin D-depleted (n=18) or standard chow (n=15) for 3 weeks. The depleted group had very low serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels (mean+/-SEM; 3.8+/-0.29 versus 40.6+/-1.19 nmol/L) and had higher mean systolic BP at week 5 (158+/-3.5 versus 134.6+/-3.7 mm Hg, P<0.001), week 6 (176.6+/-3.3 versus 162.3+/-3.8 mm Hg, P<0.01), and week 7 (171.6+/-5.1 versus 155.9+/-4.3 mm Hg, P<0.05). Vitamin D depletion led to increased relative heart weights and increased serum creatinine concentrations. Furthermore, the mRNAs of natriuretic peptides, neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin, hREN, and rRen were increased by vitamin D depletion. Regulatory T cells in the spleen and in the circulation were not affected. Ang metabolites, including Ang II and the counter-regulatory breakdown product Ang 1 to 7, were significantly up-regulated in the vitamin D-depleted groups, while ACE-1 and ACE-2 activities were not affected. CONCLUSIONS: Short-term severe vitamin D depletion aggravated hypertension and target-organ damage in dTGR. Our data suggest that even short-term severe vitamin D deficiency may directly promote hypertension and impacts on renin-angiotensin system components that could contribute to target-organ damage. The findings add to the evidence that vitamin D deficiency could also affect human hypertension.


DOI

doi:10.1161/JAHA.114.001417