Breaking Boundaries

Invitation: Breaking Boundaries – Virchow 2.0

Berlin has a long tradition as a medical metropolis and also the potential to become an international hub for the life sciences, comparable to Boston. On September 28, researchers from both cities will discuss this issue with the Governing Mayor of Berlin, Michael Müller.
With the help of the latest technologies, we want to foster medical science that uses the first cellular changes to diagnose diseases and predict the possible course of an illness.
Nikolaus Rajewsky
Nikolaus Rajewsky Director of the BIMSB of the MDC

When cells make wrong decisions, illnesses arise.” This insight comes from Berlin – from Rudolf Virchow, whose 200th birthday the city will celebrate next year. Thanks to Virchow and his contemporaries, Berlin became the home of modern medical research and is still today an internationally renowned health hub that attracts exceptional scientists. However, biomedical innovations and investors tend to be concentrated in and around Boston on the east coast of the United States.

On September 28, 2020, Nobel Laureate Phillip A. Sharp, Professor at M.I.T. in Cambridge, near Boston; Professor Heyo K. Kroemer, Chief Executive Officer of Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin; cancer physician and Charité Professor Angelika Eggert; and Professor Nikolaus Rajewsky, Director of the Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB), will discuss why Berlin now has the potential to prove itself as a comparable hub of medical research in a virtual panel with the Governing Mayor of Berlin and Senator for Science and Research Michael Müller. Together they will gain a better understanding of where the city stands, what is still lacking and what kind of developments can now be initiated.

Nikolaus Rajewsky, among others, believes that a future vision involving cell-based medicine could provide the decisive impetus. “With the help of the latest technologies, we want to foster medical science that uses the first cellular changes to diagnose diseases and predict the possible course of an illness,” he says. “Then medicine can take corrective action very early on. This makes therapy much easier. After all, waiting for symptoms to occur causes a lot of damage in the meantime.”

The program

Breaking Boundaries: “Virchow 2.0: Berlin’s potential to develop into a very strong bio hub”

Panel discussion, interviews, Q&A:

  • Michael Müller, Governing Mayor of Berlin and Senator for Science and Research
  • Professor Heyo K. Kroemer, Chief Executive Officer, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin
  • Professor Angelika Eggert, Head of the Department of Pediatrics, Division of Oncology and Hematology, Charité – Universitätsmedizin Berlin
  • Professor Phillip A. Sharp, Nobel Laureate, M.I.T., Cambridge, near Boston
  • Professor Nikolaus Rajewsky, Director of the Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB) of the MDC

Moderator: Jan-Martin Wiarda, Journalist

Time and venue:

September 28, 2020, 5:30 – 7:15 p.m.

  • Large Conference Room of the MDC in Berlin-Mitte / BIMSB, Hannoversche Str. 28
  • on Zoom (see below)

Participation and registration:

Anyone interested can follow the event in German or English for free via Zoom. Registration:

German: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_PWRF5fMVRpypNlvrdY6LXw
English: https://zoom.us/webinar/register/WN_bsD2f6KFQTquLfBnmKdbrw 

Due to the pandemic, the physical participation of journalists at the venue is limited. Please contact us if you would like to attend the event in person to take photographs or audio recordings or to interview panelists. Phillip A. Sharp (telephone, Zoom) and Nikolaus Rajewsky are available for interviews in advance.

„Breaking Boundaries – Bridging Science, Arts, Humanities, Politics, the Clinic & the Public“

Nikolaus Rajewsky conceptualized the event series “Breaking Boundaries – Bridging Science, Arts, Humanities, Politics, the Clinic & the Public.” It began in 2019 with a look back, 30 years after the fall of the Berlin Wall. One of the founders of the Neues Forum citizen rights’ movement, Professor Jens Reich, joined songwriter Wolf Biermann to recall life in the GDR and the radical changes that would soon take place. The evening about caution and fear, encouragement and courage, defiance and the will to change, responsibility and cowardice ended with a concert by Wolf and Pamela Biermann. Now the series continues with the second edition, this time virtual, and a look ahead: the future of Berlin as an emerging medical metropolis.
 

Further information

Contact for journalists

Jana Schlütter
Editor, Communications Department

Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC)
+49 (0)30 9406 2121
jana.schluetter@mdc-berlin.de or presse@mdc-berlin.de

The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC)

 

The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) was founded in Berlin in 1992. It is named for the German-American physicist Max Delbrück, who was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. The MDC's mission is to study molecular mechanisms in order to understand the origins of disease and thus be able to diagnose, prevent and fight it better and more effectively. In these efforts the MDC cooperates with the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH ) as well as with national partners such as the German Center for Cardiovascular Research and numerous international research institutions. More than 1,600 staff and guests from nearly 60 countries work at the MDC, just under 1,300 of them in scientific research. The MDC is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (90 percent) and the State of Berlin (10 percent), and is a member of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers. www.mdc-berlin.de