Gemälde

When DNA becomes part of a painting

Cancer researcher and conceptual artist Anton Henssen opens his first solo exhibition in Berlin on June 6. In the Alte Münze, the children's oncologe presents works in which he deals with circular DNA.
DNA becomes part of the identity of an image and thus experiences a kind of rebirth.
Anton G. Henssen
Anton Henssen Cancer researcher and conceptual artist

Anton Henssen is a painter, conceptual artist and Emmy Noether working group leader at the Experimental and Clinical Research Center (ECRC ), a joint institution of the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC). Henssen's research focuses on genetic phenomena, which he investigates using modern sequencing methods. In his first solo exhibition, which will open on June 6 at the Alte Münze in Berlin, Anton Henssen will present new works dealing with the topic of DNA circularization. The show entitled "Circular DNA" will be presented on the second floor of the Alte Münze at Berlin's Molkenmarkt.

Untitled, 2018
Human DNA, Oil and lacquer on linen, in artist's frame
9 4/10 × 11 4/5 in; 24 × 30 cm

Henssen extracts circular DNA from human tissue and applies it in layers on canvases. On the canvas, he mixes the invisible DNA with oil paint, acrylic, and paint spray. For Anton Henssen, the disappearance of DNA in color and image is an attempt to deal with the theme of identity. "The exploration of our human blueprint requires the extraction, isolation and sequencing of DNA from our cells. In my painting I reverse the process. I mix the DNA and let it become anonymous again in the layers of the picture. The DNA becomes, so to speak, a component of the identity of an image and thus experiences a kind of rebirth," he says.

Exhibition

ANTON HENSSEN | CIRCULAR DNA

2nd floor at Alte Münze
Molkenmarkt 2
10179 Berlin

Open: 6 June 2019, 6 p.m. – 9 p.m.

Opening hours:
6 - 23 June 2019
Thurs - Sun, 4 p.m. - 8 p.m.

Further informations

As a physician and researcher, Anton Henssen has specialised in paediatric oncology, i.e. cancer in children. Since the end of 2018, he has headed an Emmy Noether research group at the ECRC, which is also a guest group at the MDC; at the same time, he works at the Charité as a physician in the Clinic for Paediatrics with a focus on haematology and oncology: "Better treatment for children with cancer".

Alte Münze Website

The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine (MDC)

 

The Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC) was founded in Berlin in 1992. It is named for the German-American physicist Max Delbrück, who was awarded the 1969 Nobel Prize in Physiology and Medicine. The MDC's mission is to study molecular mechanisms in order to understand the origins of disease and thus be able to diagnose, prevent and fight it better and more effectively. In these efforts the MDC cooperates with the Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin and the Berlin Institute of Health (BIH ) as well as with national partners such as the German Center for Cardiovascular Research and numerous international research institutions. More than 1,600 staff and guests from nearly 60 countries work at the MDC, just under 1,300 of them in scientific research. The MDC is funded by the German Federal Ministry of Education and Research (90 percent) and the State of Berlin (10 percent), and is a member of the Helmholtz Association of German Research Centers. www.mdc-berlin.de

Contact

Jutta Kramm
Head of the Communications Department
Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association (MDC)

+49(0)30 9406-2140
jutta.kramm@mdc-berlin.de